• RSS
  • Twitter
  • FaceBook

Welcome to ISAserver.org

Forums | Register | Login | My Profile | Inbox | RSS RSS icon | My Subscription | My Forums | Address Book | Member List | Search | FAQ | Ticket List | Log Out

To Dr.Shinder

Users viewing this topic: none

Logged in as: Guest
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [ISA Server 2000 Misc.] >> ISA Server Certification (70-227) >> To Dr.Shinder Page: [1]
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
To Dr.Shinder - 18.Jun.2004 8:17:00 AM   
Siavash

 

Posts: 3
Joined: 4.Jun.2004
Status: offline
hi Dr.shinder

I know you are a really successful man in your life because you have understood how to live in this world. because of this, it is clear that you are a genius man. so i want to ask you a question about how to study.

you know that in IT Technology there are too many books to read like your books about ISA server or network infrastructure ( i have all of them "[Smile]" ). my question is how to read these really big and long books and understand them and memorize them ? ... this is really impossible to read too many books and memorize them. if it is possible maybe i am in a wrong way. i need some guide and tips about how to study.

any idea? any site ? any book ? any info. ?

Thanks to Dr.shinder
Post #: 1
RE: To Dr.Shinder - 27.Jun.2004 1:06:00 AM   
leonhughes

 

Posts: 149
Joined: 19.Mar.2001
From: UK
Status: offline
I'm not Dr Shinder, but let me give some insight from my point of view. Passing exams isn't really about reading books and memorising information - it's about learning and understanding a product and using books for reference material to enforce your understanding. Most people who are legitimately succesful with exams are so because they have either significant expeirience with a product or have taken the time to learn a product properly. Just reading a book can't even begin to teach you the primary objective of what the exam is trying to test.

Leon.

[ June 27, 2004, 01:07 AM: Message edited by: leonhughes ]

(in reply to Siavash)
Post #: 2
RE: To Dr.Shinder - 28.Jun.2004 9:02:00 AM   
George_Ou

 

Posts: 31
Joined: 20.Jun.2004
From: Sunnyvale
Status: offline
I hate to say this, but I have seen many MCPs "Multiple Choice Professionals" that have gotten certified with no real world experience who literally just memorized every single cheaters cram sheet they could get their hands on. IÆve seen this many times first hand.

On the other hand, I've also seen people who are very knowledgeable get killed in the exams because they're thinking too much real world and make mistakes and fail. It's very unfortunate, but that is the nature of certifications. That is certainly not the spirit of certification, but it is reality. Certifications can indeed help the true professional, but in my experience it doesn't always produce competent people.

(in reply to Siavash)
Post #: 3
RE: To Dr.Shinder - 28.Jun.2004 12:08:00 PM   
leonhughes

 

Posts: 149
Joined: 19.Mar.2001
From: UK
Status: offline
I do agree with you - the point I was trying to make though is that there is no point giving someone advice on how to 'memorise' a book, questions or whatever. This totally devalues the certification and every 'real' IT professional. There are so many cowboys in this industry. In my opinion this is why IT salaries have depleted in the last 5 years.

Rant over [Smile]

(in reply to Siavash)
Post #: 4
RE: To Dr.Shinder - 28.Jun.2004 9:26:00 PM   
George_Ou

 

Posts: 31
Joined: 20.Jun.2004
From: Sunnyvale
Status: offline
quote:
Originally posted by leonhughes:
I do agree with you - the point I was trying to make though is that there is no point giving someone advice on how to 'memorise' a book, questions or whatever. This totally devalues the certification and every 'real' IT professional. There are so many cowboys in this industry. In my opinion this is why IT salaries have depleted in the last 5 years.

Rant over [Smile]

You're right. I shouldnÆt be so jaded. If people like Siavash take the exam cram memorization approach, it might seem like the easy road to get IT certification. But when a Multiple Choice Professional takes to the real job market, they get slaughtered. Maybe in the crazy environment of the dot.boom era, you could get away with it. But in this environment, you will get tossed aside.

(in reply to Siavash)
Post #: 5
RE: To Dr.Shinder - 30.Jun.2004 8:04:00 AM   
Siavash

 

Posts: 3
Joined: 4.Jun.2004
Status: offline
Special Thanks to all of you buddies.really good tips.as you mentioned IT is not just knowledge. it is knowledge + exprience.

but reading books is really an important thnig.so we gotta know some advanced way to reading them.

(in reply to Siavash)
Post #: 6
RE: To Dr.Shinder - 4.Jul.2004 9:04:00 PM   
tshinder

 

Posts: 50013
Joined: 10.Jan.2001
From: Texas
Status: offline
Hey guys,

My approach to learning things is to do them first, and then read the books after doing things. This is why I think VMware is such a great product for all people who are trying to learn about computers, networking, etc. At least Windows. You still need access to the hardware for learning about hardware manufacturers stuff.

I always tried to "figure things out" for serveral hours and it may or may not work. But during the process of trying to make something work, I think about issues that would not consider if I had read the book first. After either succeeding or failing, I then read the book. The brings the content of the book into sharp focus and I almost always figure out what I've done wrong when trying to just "figure it out".

This approach doesn't work for all subjects. For example, you can just "figure out" TCP/IP, you have to study it and learn how it works. Douglas Comer's book on TCP/IP is great and everyone should read it and understand everything in it. Then many of the "mysterious" things we seeing in the networking space everyday are no longer mysteries and you can figure things out based on that core knowledge.

Thanks!
Tom

(in reply to Siavash)
Post #: 7
RE: To Dr.Shinder - 18.Jul.2004 6:44:00 AM   
trebligb

 

Posts: 94
Joined: 13.Feb.2002
Status: offline
What I have seen that makes people successful does not necessarily involve knowing everything about ISA Server, or Windows, or whatever they are working with. Rather, it is understanding what is required to make something work. That sounded stupid, let me try again.

Say you need to get to the Internet for example. You need to know that you have to have a route to get there, Name resolution, and permission to get there. This is where we seperate the paper certified folks and the professionals. A paper certified dude will sit there and screw around with settings all day in ISA server hoping by randomly changing something it will work. They may be ultra familiar with the interface of ISA server, but not have the supporting knowledge of TCP/IP to know what isn't happening. A true professional can run down the list of all the different things that need to work for web browsing to work and identify which of those things are not cooperating. Even if that person is not knowledgeable on ISA server they will have a pretty good idea of where the problem is and where the resources are to find the answer.

I think what it comes down to are new folks concentrating on getting that MCP or MCSE and etcetera since those (in theory) drive the higher salary. Then they get spanked in the real world. What they really need to do is learn the material for the more basic certs like A+ and Net+. This with some experience gained at a low level while attaining these certs will build the base of knowledge that can enable somebody to be successful. Then go for the bigger certifications.

(in reply to Siavash)
Post #: 8

Page:   [1] << Older Topic    Newer Topic >>
All Forums >> [ISA Server 2000 Misc.] >> ISA Server Certification (70-227) >> To Dr.Shinder Page: [1]
Jump to:

New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts